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2 Adimús to venerate the Orisha Olokun, the owner of the ocean

Adimu for Olokun

La Orisha Olokun It is one of the most controversial deities within the Yoruba Pantheon, being considered androgynous for some devotees, the truth is that the Ifá priests consider it a male entity while for the santeros it is identified as a female deity.

Olokun is the Orisha who treasures the secrets that lie at the bottom of the ocean, she is wise and protective of her children. His anger is relentless and often manifests itself across the sea in its most hostile and violent state.

She is a saint who is received to obtain health and a seat, she considers herself a protector of the family and a tireless defender of just causes. Olokun lives inside a clay jar surrounded by his otás, snails and a small lead representation of his treasures.

Offerings for the mistress of the ocean, Olokun

On the lid of its receptacle the addimús for this Orisha are placed, before depositing them the santero kneels on a mat and invokes the deity through the sound of his maraca and two white candles that he arranges on a plate in front of the representation of the Saint.

The power of fruits versus Olokun's receptacle

When the religious wishes to venerate Olokun there is no better offering than to place a small basket with fresh fruits before the receptacle of this deity.

This tribute is well received by the saint, especially if among the fruits is the melon or watermelon, which is one of the favorite addimus of this saint. 

This adimú is allowed to rest at the foot of the saint for seven days, after which it must be deposited in the sea as the culminating step of said veneration for the deity.

7 crowbars of gofio and melao to worship the mistress of the depths

There is no more exquisite delicacy for Olokun than the crowbars, these are made by mixing powdered gofio and cane honey in a container, it is used in this dish more gofio than melao, since it seeks to obtain a kind of solid pasta that can be molded with the hands.

Once the mixture has obtained the desired consistency, the small balls are made, until reaching seven levers.

Later they are deposited on a white plate which will be placed by the devotee on the lid of the Olokun jar, which will have to be turned beforehand.

This work is left to rest until the levers crumble on their own, once this has happened they are discarded in the trash.

Adimu for Olokun
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